MUSIC

The music that accompanies the program provides a fun and active way of learning, through songs and movement. The kit comes with two CDs - one with original music and the second with phrases and vocabulary the children are learning, set to well known melodies. Both disks have playbacks of all the songs.
Music is an integral part of the program and fosters the children's phonological capabilities in Hebrew.

The songs are written especially for program using words and phrases that the children are learning.
Here are examples of songs, their placement in the program and the language learning that they support:

1. "Shalom Yeladim" (hello children)

This song appears in the first teacher's guide and provides an example of the spiral curriculum – how each lesson builds on the lesson/s that precedes it and incorporates all the language that has already been learned.
A. In the first study unit, the children sing the song with the word "Shalom (Hello)" and the names of the children in their class.
B. In the second study unit the children sing the song using the words "Shalom (Hello)" and "Ani (I)".
C. In the third study unit, the children sing the sing song incorporating and practicing the words Ani (I), Ata (You m), At (You f).
D. In the fourth study unit, the children incorporate "naiim meod (nice to meet you)" in the chorus.
E. In the eighth study unit, the children incorporate the phrase "lehitraot (see you soon)" in the chorus.
F. In the fifteenth study the children incorporate the form of "Me at (who are you f)" and  "Me ata (who are you m)".

2. "Shana Tova, Shana Metuka" (Happy new year, sweet new year)

This song provides an example of the flexibility of the music by showing how festival vocabulary with combined with the various levels of language the children have learned.
In this song the children and their teacher can choose to whom they want to send blessings for the new year. Initially the children sing in a simple form e.g. using the singular, later they can incorporate plurals and masculine and feminine according to the study units they have learned.

3. "Yeish po mashehu" (There is something here)

This is an example of a song for practicing phrases and vocabulary the children are learning, set to well a known melody. This song rehearses the word "something". It requires matching an adjective to a noun, in plural and singular and in the masculine and feminine forms.

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